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With Developing World's Policy Support, Global Renewable Energy Generation Capacity Jumps to Record Level

Visit http://www.ren21.net/REN21Activities/GlobalStatusReport.aspx for further information

REN 21's Renewables 2014 Global Status Report launched

Submitted on 06/03/14, 05:48 AM

Now 95 emerging economies nurture renewable energy growth through supportive policies, up six-fold from just 15 countries in 2005;


Renewable electricity capacity achieves new record level, jumps 8.3% in 2013, accounts for more than 56% of net additions to global power capacity; renewables meet almost one-fifth of world final energy consumption.

The number of emerging economy nations with policies in place to support the expansion of renewable energy has surged more than six-fold in just eight years, from 15 developing countries in 2005 to 95 early this year.

Those 95 developing nations today make up the vast majority of the 144 countries with renewable energy support policies and targets in place. The rise of developing world support contrasts with declining support and renewables policy uncertainty and even retroactive support reductions in some European countries and the United States.

Launched at the UN-hosted Sustainable Energy for All in New York, the 2014 report credits support policies with a central role in driving global renewable energy capacity to a new record level last year - 1,560 gigawatts (GW), up 8.3% from 2012. More than 22 % of the world's power production now comes from renewable sources.

"Today in many markets wind energy's most compelling selling point is cost-competitiveness," said Steve Sawyer, GWEC Secretary General. "Wind is already competing successfully against heavily subsidized incumbents in a growing number of markets around the world as the technology and its implementation steadily improve; and job creation remains a priority just about everywhere. Furthermore, recent events in Ukraine and elsewhere point to wind energy's contribution to energy security," Sawyer continued.

In 2013, an estimated 6.5 million people worldwide worked directly or indirectly in the renewable energy sector.

Among highlights:
Overall last year, renewables accounted for more than 56% of net additions to global power capacity.
Hydropower rose by 4% to approximately 1,000 GW in 2013, accounting for about one-third of renewable power capacity added during the year. Other renewables collectively grew nearly 17% to an estimated 560 GW.
Renewable energy provided 19% of global final energy consumption in 2012, and continued to grow in 2013. Of this total share in 2012, modern renewables accounted for 10% with the remaining 9% coming from traditional biomass the share of which is declining.
For the first time, more solar PV than wind power capacity was added worldwide.
Even as global investment in solar PV declined nearly 22% relative to 2012, new capacity installations increased by more than 27%. The solar PV market had a record year, adding about 38 GW in 2013 for a total of approximately 138 GW. China saw spectacular growth, accounting for nearly one third of global capacity added, followed by Japan and the United States.
China, the United States, Brazil, Canada, and Germany remained the top countries for total installed renewable power capacity.
China's new renewable power capacity surpassed new fossil fuel and nuclear capacity for the first time.
Growing numbers of cities, states, and regions seek to transition to 100% renewable energy in either individual sectors or economy-wide. For example, Djibouti, Scotland, and the small-island state of Tuvalu aim to derive 100% of their electricity from renewable sources by 2020.
Uruguay, Mauritius, and Costa Rica were among the top countries for investment in new renewable power and fuels relative to annual GDP.
More than 35 GW of wind power capacity was added in 2013, totalling just more than 318 GW. However, despite several record years, the market was down nearly 10 GW compared to 2012, reflecting primarily a steep drop in the U.S. market. Offshore wind had a record year, with 1.6 GW added, almost all of it in the EU.
Heating and cooling from modern biomass, solar, and geothermal sources account for a small but gradually rising share of final global heat demand, amounting to an estimated 10%.
Global new investment in renewable power and fuels was at least USD 249.4 billion in 2013 down from its record level in 2011.

"Global perceptions of renewable energy have shifted considerably," says Arthouros Zervos, Chair of REN21. "Over the last 10 years, continuing technology advances and rapid deployment of many renewable energy technologies have demonstrated that the question is no longer whether renewables have a role to play in the provision of energy services, but rather how we can best increase the current pace to achieve a 100% renewables future with full energy access for all. For this to be become reality, current thinking needs to change: continuing the status quo of a patchwork of policies and actions is no longer sufficient."

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